Govt. Stall Takes General Flynn Case Down A Very Dark Path

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stall

The way that Justice Department prosecutors are trying to stall for time, in the case to overturn General Michael Flynn’s ill advised guilty plea, shows a blatant attempt to lead the court down a dark and dangerous path through Deep State treachery. Instead of coming up with answers, government prosecutors are dragging their feet with one of the oldest tricks in the legal book, blame the delay on someone else.

Government stall blamed on former lawyers

Last week, DOJ prosecutors asked for a delay, moving the scheduled April 3 status hearing to April 24. The stall seems calculated specifically to give prosecutors more time to think of something to tell presiding Federal Judge Emmet T. Sullivan. They need to convince him to keep their case alive. Former National Security Advisor Flynn’s new legal team is asking for a dismissal on the grounds that the government is illegally hiding crucial evidence.

Instead of asking for more time to find the missing documents that the government is supposed to produce, they blame the delay on newly discovered evidence just turned over by Flynn’s former legal team. Apparently, it had been laying around unnoticed. The DOJ needs three extra weeks for their team of paralegals to read a box of records. It will take that long because they claim they need to use a magnifying glass to make it out.

According to the stall motion, the newly released documents “are voluminous, span numerous topics that arose during Covington’s 30-month representation of Mr. Flynn, and include many pages of sometimes difficult-to-decipher handwritten notes.” So, they insist, “the government needs additional time to digest this information and any additional information that Covington may provide.” They aren’t actually expecting more files, it just sounds good. It also saves them from telling the court that they still haven’t been able to locate crucial documents used to bring charges in the first place. Blame it all on the former lawyers, nobody liked them anyway.

“In order to allow the government adequate time to review the materials that have been produced and to request, receive, and review any follow-up information or documents, the government respectfully asks this Court to allow the government three additional weeks to provide a further status update and, if feasible, a proposed briefing schedule.” That last line means they hope to be able to buy even more time by “scheduling” things even further down the road once the three weeks runs out.

A dangerous path through Deep State darkness

“Meanwhile, the government still refuses to produce the original 302 and the DOJ memo of January 30, 2017 that exonerated him of any Russia issue,” Flynn’s new lawyer, Sidney Powell explains. The prosecution needs to stall because they “still refuse to dismiss the case.”

They keep trying, despite “the egregious government misconduct from the inception of this persecution,” which included “slipping an FBI Agent secretly into a presidential briefing in August 2016.” That incident happened before the election and was nothing but an attempt “to collect information on nominee Trump and General Flynn.”

“The country and Justice would be best served if the DOJ would take responsibility for these outrageous actions and the deliberate attempted destruction of an honorable man.” That will never happen and she knows it. It’s been well established that “the agents who interviewed him knew he was honest with them. They later altered the 302 until it was approved by Andrew McCabe.”

One interesting discrepancy to note is that the “voluminous” records, that the DOJ needs a three week stall to sift through, may not be as extensive as the Justice Department wants the court to believe. It looks like they’re seriously exaggerating. A note from the previous lawyers that came along with the missing materials paints a totally different picture.

“We have found emails and two pages of handwritten notes that were not previously transferred to successor counsel,” former lawyers Robert Kelner and Stephan P. Anthony wrote. “With respect to the emails, this appears to have resulted from errors in the process of collecting and searching electronic materials that were not contained in the working case file. The two pages of notes appear to have been inadvertently missed during the file transfer process.”

5 COMMENTS

  1. Now it seems only the guilty are the ones complaining about how the system works. Now how about if your lawyer representing you was not allowed delays to get to the bottom of all the evidence that is available. Just because some want to make the Government look bad at every turn is not a good thing. The laws are written so that if the prosecution does something wrong there are appeals , nothing is cut and dried at the first court case. Just trying to make the FBI look bad is never good for this USA as a whole, which is what Trump has been doing since he took office, most probably because of how many times they have investigated Trump in the past 20 years.

  2. Flynn has 30 years of honorable service and when he accepted the job from Trump he certainly didn’t expect that the deep state and Obama administration had him on a first to get rid of list. This is a travesty of justice and with the long process to get him indicted and convicted they demonstrated a kill at any cost approach to prove he was guilty of a crime which really amounted to almost nothing in terms of meeting with a Russian. I hope this whole debacle will end although the main reason in my mind why the DOJ is trying to continue this is because they will definitely be liable for massive retribution they will be paying General Flynn for their failed efforts. He’s innocent and everyone knows it, Judge Sullivan hopefully will dismiss it because the proof of his crime isn’t there.

  3. Isn’t Barr in charge of the DOJ. Why is he allowing this trial to go on. Why isn’t he telling his prosecutors to drop a case costing too much money for the taxpayer.

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